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How to make ...

Siboney

By Harvey Johnson

Ingredients

50ml Dark Rum

25ml Pineapple Juice

25ml Lemon Juice

12.5ml Passionfruit Syrup

½ a Passionfruit for Garnish

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

213 calories

Allergens:

No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!

Servings:

Serves 1

Another tiki creation courtesy of the great man himself, Trader Vic, the Siboney is a straight-up, Martini-styled tweak of a Daiquiri that closely resembles a Hurricane.

Ingredients

50ml Dark Rum

25ml Pineapple Juice

25ml Lemon Juice

12.5ml Passionfruit Syrup

½ a Passionfruit for Garnish

Method

Chill a martini glass/coupette in the freezer or fill it with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the rum, pineapple juice and passionfruit syrup to the shaker.

Using your Mexican elbow and a jigger to measure, squeeze 25ml of lime juice and add it to the shaker.

Fill your shaker with cubed ice and seal using your Boston tin or lid, before shaking vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your glass from the freezer or empty it of ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain your cocktail into your chilled martini glass or coupette.

Garnish by floating half a passionfruit in the drink.

Serve and enjoy!

History

This cocktail, like so many of the tiki greats, was created for Trader Vic’s. Tiki expert and cocktail historian Jeff ‘Beachbum’ Berry found this cocktail in Trader Vic’s Rum Cookery and Drinkery from 1974, but went on to trace its history back to first appearing on the Trader’s menus sometime back in the heady days of the 1950’s.

As Jeff ‘Beachbum’ Berry points out in his book, Potions of the Caribbean, in a savvy and rather frugal move by Trader Vic, perhaps to keep inventory down, this recipe doubled, with the addition of some angostura bitters and served long, over crushed ice, produces Trader Vic’s house grog.