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Mixology Guide

CALL 03333 44 77 65
OR REQUEST A QUOTE

17A KINGSLAND ROAD, LONDON E2 8AA

"This one is reminiscent of an ice peach tea that you might imagine drinking in the sweltering heat on a porch somewhere in Georgia.."

How to make ...

Non-Alcoholic Georgia Mint Julep

Mint juleps can be made in several different ways; this one is reminiscent of an ice peach tea that you might imagine drinking in the sweltering heat on a porch somewhere in Georgia.

Method

Take your julep tin.

Strip a large handful of mint leaves from their stems.

Give the mint one hard clap between the palms of your hands to release the oils and awaken the flavours.

Add the mint and lemon chunks to your tin.

Using your jigger to measure, add the peach tea, lemon chunks, mint leaves to the tin.

Fill the tin with crushed ice.

Using your bar spoon, churn the drink, making sure to scoop all the mint and ingredients up from the bottom of the glass to combine them.

Stir for 10-12 seconds or until some of the crushed ice has melted and the wash level of the drink has gone down a little.

Top with a pile of crushed ice and use your hand to form it into a dome.

Garnish with a mint sprig and a straw.

Serve and enjoy!

Equipment

Jigger/Measure

Bar Spoon

Julep Tin

Crushed Ice

History

The Mint Julep first appears in the 1862 edition of The Bar-Tender’s Guide, where Jerry Thomas describes it as a ‘peculiarly American beverage’.

The exact origin isn’t entirely clear, although there are mentions of people in southern states drinking a dram of liquor steeped in mint as a medicinal remedy. This is perhaps where the name of the cocktail derives, as a ‘julep’ is a sweet drink that acts as a vehicle for medicine. The original recipe used a handful of mint and pounded it with sugar, before adding brandy and crushed ice. Bourbon became the more widely used spirit, as it was cheaper and more readily available.

Since 1938 the Mint Julep has been promoted alongside the Kentucky Derby, as the drink has always been emblematic of the Southern American states. Around 120,000 mint juleps are made each year at the horse racing event.

Allergens
Contains mint
Ingredients

75ml of Peach Tea

2 lemon chunks

6-8 Mint leaves

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

184 calories

Servings:

Serves 1

Method

Take your julep tin.

Strip a large handful of mint leaves from their stems.

Give the mint one hard clap between the palms of your hands to release the oils and awaken the flavours.

Add the mint and lemon chunks to your tin.

Using your jigger to measure, add the peach tea, lemon chunks, mint leaves to the tin.

Fill the tin with crushed ice.

Using your bar spoon, churn the drink, making sure to scoop all the mint and ingredients up from the bottom of the glass to combine them.

Stir for 10-12 seconds or until some of the crushed ice has melted and the wash level of the drink has gone down a little.

Top with a pile of crushed ice and use your hand to form it into a dome.

Garnish with a mint sprig and a straw.

Serve and enjoy!

Equipment

Jigger/Measure

Bar Spoon

Julep Tin

Crushed Ice

History

The Mint Julep first appears in the 1862 edition of The Bar-Tender’s Guide, where Jerry Thomas describes it as a ‘peculiarly American beverage’.

The exact origin isn’t entirely clear, although there are mentions of people in southern states drinking a dram of liquor steeped in mint as a medicinal remedy. This is perhaps where the name of the cocktail derives, as a ‘julep’ is a sweet drink that acts as a vehicle for medicine. The original recipe used a handful of mint and pounded it with sugar, before adding brandy and crushed ice. Bourbon became the more widely used spirit, as it was cheaper and more readily available.

Since 1938 the Mint Julep has been promoted alongside the Kentucky Derby, as the drink has always been emblematic of the Southern American states. Around 120,000 mint juleps are made each year at the horse racing event.

Allergens
Contains mint
Recommended

The Vodka Tonic might only be a simple mixed drink but its such an old and elegant high-ball that it is often included in cocktail books and bar manuals as one of the archetypal tall drinks.

Along with its slightly more popular sibling, the Gin & Tonic, the Vodka Tonic is a resounding favourite—combining dry, subtle vodka with bittersweet tonic and a fresh, fruity garnish to create a drink that’s beautifully balanced in its basicness. This refreshing high-ball is a great choice all year round and a fantastic addition to a vodka-based menu.

Thanks to its clean, subtle flavour profile, vodka is one of the most versatile spirits for mixology, if you’re planning on serving a vodka-based selection, there are a ton of great drinks you could serve alongside the Vodka Tonic, to offer a wide and diverse menu. Some of our favourite vodka cocktails include the Caprioska; a deliciously zingy twist on the Caipirinha, featuring vodka in place of cachaca, mixed with lime, sugar and crushed ice, the Moscow Mule; another simple high-ball, consisting of vodka, lime and ginger ale, or even the classic Cosmopolitan; a tangy, dry, daisy-style mixture of vodka, lime and cranberry juice.

If you’re planning on serving a Vodka Tonic as part of your cocktail menu and want to know more about what drinks might be good to serve with it, be sure to speak to your event organiser about your options, or check out some other vodka-based, high-ball and classic cocktails from our list.

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