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Mixology Guide

CALL 03333 44 77 65
OR REQUEST A QUOTE

17A KINGSLAND ROAD, LONDON E2 8AA

"While this cocktail has a very simple structure, the myriad of flavours contained in those ingredients means the Negroni is rich and balanced.."

How to make ...

Negroni

This hugely popular cocktail has been an Italian favourite for decades, the rich, bitter complexity of this drink makes it a unique and moreish cocktail.

Method

Take your rocks glass and, using your jigger to measure, add the gin, vermouth and Campari to the glass.

Fill the glass ⅔ with cubed ice and, using your bar spoon, gently stir to combine, holding the spoon between your thumb and forefinger and allowing it to move as you stir. This will ensure you stir smoothly and don’t break the ice up while doing so.

Top the glass up with more cubed ice. Garnish with an orange slice or a twist of orange peel.

Serve and enjoy!

History

The most widely accepted version of how the Negroni was invented can be traced back to Florence in 1919. It is said that Count Camillo Negroni came back to Italy from America after spending time on a cattle ranch.

He had a new found like of hard liquor and asked the bartender at Caffè Casoni, reported to be Fosco Scarselli, to replace the soda in his Americano with gin. There are of course some conflicting accounts, as with any history of a cocktail. Family of General Pascal Olivier de Negroni, Count de Negroni claim that he was the Count Negroni who invented the drink in 1857 in Senegal.

The most widely accepted version of how the Negroni was invented can be traced back to Florence in 1919. It is said that Count Camillo Negroni came back to Italy from America after spending time on a cattle ranch. He had a new found like of hard liquor and asked the bartender at Caffè Casoni, reported to be Fosco Scarselli, to replace the soda in his Americano with gin.

Allergens
No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!
Ingredients

25ml Gin

25ml Sweet Vermouth

25ml Campari

Orange Twist or Slice to Garnish

Cubed Ice

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

119 calories

Servings:

Serves 1

Method

Take your rocks glass and, using your jigger to measure, add the gin, vermouth and Campari to the glass.

Fill the glass ⅔ with cubed ice and, using your bar spoon, gently stir to combine, holding the spoon between your thumb and forefinger and allowing it to move as you stir. This will ensure you stir smoothly and don’t break the ice up while doing so.

Top the glass up with more cubed ice. Garnish with an orange slice or a twist of orange peel.

Serve and enjoy!

History

The most widely accepted version of how the Negroni was invented can be traced back to Florence in 1919. It is said that Count Camillo Negroni came back to Italy from America after spending time on a cattle ranch.

He had a new found like of hard liquor and asked the bartender at Caffè Casoni, reported to be Fosco Scarselli, to replace the soda in his Americano with gin. There are of course some conflicting accounts, as with any history of a cocktail. Family of General Pascal Olivier de Negroni, Count de Negroni claim that he was the Count Negroni who invented the drink in 1857 in Senegal.

The most widely accepted version of how the Negroni was invented can be traced back to Florence in 1919. It is said that Count Camillo Negroni came back to Italy from America after spending time on a cattle ranch. He had a new found like of hard liquor and asked the bartender at Caffè Casoni, reported to be Fosco Scarselli, to replace the soda in his Americano with gin.

Allergens
No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!
Recommended

The Negroni has grown in popularity over the last few years to become a favourite among casual drinkers and cocktail enthusiasts alike.

While this cocktail has a very simple structure – made of only 3 ingredients, stirred with a little ice – the myriad of flavours contained in those ingredients means the Negroni is a rich and balanced cocktail, and by trying a range of different gins and vermouths you will find a unique drinking experience with each new combination.

The Negroni is a gin classic, although, whilst its a much loved cocktail, not everyone enjoys the strong bitter flavour profile of this Italian staple. For a similarly complex drink with a much sweeter flavour profile you could try the Boulevardier. This cousin of the Negroni switches the usual gin for bourbon, lending a woody, caramel-y tone to the herbal base of vermouth and Campari.

If you’re hoping to serve something longer and lower in alcohol alongside a Negroni you may want to think about its predecessor, the Americano. This drink predates the Negroni, and is traditionally served as a light aperitif. It combines the sweet vermouth and Campari with soda water instead of gin for a long, pre-dinner drink.

If gin’s your thing and you want to serve a range of classics including this celebrated spirit there are plenty of gin cocktails to suit all sorts of tastes.

If you’re planning on featuring a Negroni on your menu and want to know more about what cocktails could accompany it, be sure to speak to your event organiser about your options, or check out some other gin-based, classic, and Italian-style cocktails from our list.

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