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Mixology Guide

CALL 03333 44 77 65
OR REQUEST A QUOTE

17A KINGSLAND ROAD, LONDON E2 8AA

"The Daiquiri may have been made famous by its fruit-flavoured, blended cousins but the original is a classic and highly regarded rum-based cocktail..."

How to make ...

Daiquiri

The daddy of all rum-cocktails and the ultimate thirst-quenching sour for those sunny days by the beach or those not so sunny-days when you wish you were by a beach.

Method

Chill a martini glass/coupette in the freezer or fill it with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the rum and sugar syrup to the shaker.

Using your Mexican elbow and your jigger to measure, squeeze 25ml of lime juice and add it to the shaker.

Fill your shaker with cubed ice and seal using your Boston tin or lid, before shaking vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your glass from the freezer or empty it of ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain the cocktail into your chilled martini glass or coupette.

Garnish with a lime wheel, cut so it balances on the edge of the glass.

Serve and enjoy!”

History

Unlike most classic cocktails the history of the Daiquiri is well recorded. An American engineer, Jennings Cox, working in a Cuban mine called Daiquiri, in southeast Cuba in the 1890’s, is said to have mixed his ration of rum with lime juice and sugar for some guests.

He recorded this all in his own journal, so we can accurately attribute the drink to him. Basil Woon wrote in his 1928 book, When it’s Cocktail Time in Cuba, “The boys used to have three or four every morning. Most of them worked in the Daiquiri mines, the superintendent of which was a gentleman named Cox – Jennings Cox”.

The Daiquiri was introduced to America when a US Army officer bought the recipe back to the Army and Navy Club in Washington DC.

An American engineer, Jennings Cox, working in a Cuban mine called Daiquiri, in southeast Cuba in the 1890’s, is said to have mixed his ration of rum with lime juice and sugar for some guests. The Daiquiri was then introduced to America when a US Army officer brought the recipe back to the Army and Navy Club in Washington DC.

Allergens
No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!
Ingredients

50ml White Rum

25ml Fresh Lime Juice

12.5ml Sugar Syrup

Lime Wheel to Garnish

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

112 calories

Servings:

Serves 1

Method

Chill a martini glass/coupette in the freezer or fill it with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the rum and sugar syrup to the shaker.

Using your Mexican elbow and your jigger to measure, squeeze 25ml of lime juice and add it to the shaker.

Fill your shaker with cubed ice and seal using your Boston tin or lid, before shaking vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your glass from the freezer or empty it of ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain the cocktail into your chilled martini glass or coupette.

Garnish with a lime wheel, cut so it balances on the edge of the glass.

Serve and enjoy!”

History

Unlike most classic cocktails the history of the Daiquiri is well recorded. An American engineer, Jennings Cox, working in a Cuban mine called Daiquiri, in southeast Cuba in the 1890’s, is said to have mixed his ration of rum with lime juice and sugar for some guests.

He recorded this all in his own journal, so we can accurately attribute the drink to him. Basil Woon wrote in his 1928 book, When it’s Cocktail Time in Cuba, “The boys used to have three or four every morning. Most of them worked in the Daiquiri mines, the superintendent of which was a gentleman named Cox – Jennings Cox”.

The Daiquiri was introduced to America when a US Army officer bought the recipe back to the Army and Navy Club in Washington DC.

An American engineer, Jennings Cox, working in a Cuban mine called Daiquiri, in southeast Cuba in the 1890’s, is said to have mixed his ration of rum with lime juice and sugar for some guests. The Daiquiri was then introduced to America when a US Army officer brought the recipe back to the Army and Navy Club in Washington DC.

Allergens
No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!
Recommended

The Daiquiri may have been made famous by its fruit-flavoured, blended cousins but the original is a classic and highly regarded rum-based cocktail.

If you’re planning a mobile bar hire and want to feature a classic Daiquiri on your menu there are some other fantastic rum cocktails that could work alongside it.

Something like a classic Mojito or a Dark and Stormy could be a great choice to serve with the powerful Daiquiri. Both these drinks are served long for a more mellow, sipping cocktail. The Dark and Stormy is finished with ginger beer and includes a zing of lime, with the spiced Caribbean flavours of Angostura bitters, a deliciously warming cocktail to pair with the fresh and tangy Daiquiri.

For those interested in featuring some more exotically flavoured Daiquiris for their menu there are a number of ways to customise this cocktail, using various fresh fruits and fruit-flavoured liqueurs. The Strawberry Daiquiri is a particularly popular variation on this classic drink, this version adds fresh strawberries and strawberry puree for a sweet, pink, berry flavoured take on the original.

If you’re eager to feature a Daiquiri on your menu and want to know more about what cocktails might be good to serve alongside it, make sure to speak to your event organiser about your options, or check out some other rum-based, classic and sour style cocktails from our list.

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