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Mixology Guide

CALL 03333 44 77 65
OR REQUEST A QUOTE

17A KINGSLAND ROAD, LONDON E2 8AA

"The Breakfast Martini might sound like an oxymoron but this modern classic isn’t just reserved for the morning.."

How to make ...

Breakfast Martini

A harmonious mixture of gin, lemon, triple sec and marmalade. The Breakfast Martini is a delicious and simple drink full of citrus and sweet orange flavours, with a hint of bitterness.

Method

Chill your martini glass in the freezer or fill it with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the Gin, lemon juice and triple sec syrup to the shaker

Using your bar spoon, add one or two spoonfuls of marmalade to the shaker.

Fill your shaker with cubed ice and seal with Boston tin or lid, before shaking vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your glass from the freezer or empty of ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain the cocktail into your chilled martini glass.

Garnish with an orange twist.

Serve and enjoy!

History

The drink was created at the Lanesborough Hotel in 1996 by Salvatore Calabrese. The structure of the drink is a White Lady. A Marmalade Martini appears in Harry Craddock’s Savoy Cocktail Book. Similar in construction, Craddock didn’t use triple sec in his version. Calabrese maintains the inspiration for his drink came solely from his marmalade breakfast.

The story of the breakfast martini’s creation, unsurprisingly, started at breakfast. Being what he calls typically Italian, Salvatore’s breakfast would usually consist of a shot of espresso before leaving for work. One morning his wife forced him to eat something, claiming he looked more tired than usual, she made him marmalade on toast. He went to work that day with the idea of using the ingredients in a drink.

The drink was created at the Lanesborough Hotel in 2000 by Salvatore Calabrese. Being what he calls typically Italian, Salvatore’s breakfast would usually consist of a shot of espresso before leaving for work. One morning his wife forced him to eat something, claiming he looked more tired than usual, she made him marmalade on toast. He went to work that day with the idea of using the ingredients in a drink.

Allergens
No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!
Ingredients

25ml Gin

25ml Triple Sec

25ml Lemon Juice

1-2 Spoonfuls of Marmalade

Orange twist to garnish

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

146 Calories

Servings:

Serves 1

Method

Chill your martini glass in the freezer or fill it with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the Gin, lemon juice and triple sec syrup to the shaker

Using your bar spoon, add one or two spoonfuls of marmalade to the shaker.

Fill your shaker with cubed ice and seal with Boston tin or lid, before shaking vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your glass from the freezer or empty of ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain the cocktail into your chilled martini glass.

Garnish with an orange twist.

Serve and enjoy!

History

The drink was created at the Lanesborough Hotel in 1996 by Salvatore Calabrese. The structure of the drink is a White Lady. A Marmalade Martini appears in Harry Craddock’s Savoy Cocktail Book. Similar in construction, Craddock didn’t use triple sec in his version. Calabrese maintains the inspiration for his drink came solely from his marmalade breakfast.

The story of the breakfast martini’s creation, unsurprisingly, started at breakfast. Being what he calls typically Italian, Salvatore’s breakfast would usually consist of a shot of espresso before leaving for work. One morning his wife forced him to eat something, claiming he looked more tired than usual, she made him marmalade on toast. He went to work that day with the idea of using the ingredients in a drink.

The drink was created at the Lanesborough Hotel in 2000 by Salvatore Calabrese. Being what he calls typically Italian, Salvatore’s breakfast would usually consist of a shot of espresso before leaving for work. One morning his wife forced him to eat something, claiming he looked more tired than usual, she made him marmalade on toast. He went to work that day with the idea of using the ingredients in a drink.

Allergens
No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!
Recommended

The Breakfast Martini might sound like an oxymoron but this modern classic isn’t just reserved for the morning.

This dry and balanced, citrusy gin drink is a great addition to a gin based menu or a fantastic inclusion for those planning a brunch time bar hire.

The Breakfast Martini is a gorgeous gin sour sweetened with marmalade, a perfect option for gin enthusiasts looking to try something a little more unusual than the average gin classic, but still packed with flavour and sophistication.

This gin drink is short and strong so if you’re featuring it on your menu you may want to include some longer, lighter options like a Tom Collins or a South Side Fizz: a gin sour flavoured with mint and topped with soda to make a long refreshing springtime drink.

If you want to serve a brunch inspired menu at your bar hire The Breakfast Martini is a great choice and would go fantastically alongside other brunch Classics like the Mimosa; a mixture of fresh orange juice and champagne, or even a Bloody Mary or other Snapper cocktails.

If you’re interested in serving the Breakfast Martini as part of your cocktail menu and want to know more about what drinks might pair well with it, be sure to speak to your event organiser about your options or check out some other gin based, Martini-style and sour-style cocktails from our list.

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