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How to make ...

Batida

By Adam Hinton

Ingredients

 

50ml Cachaça

12.5ml Lime Juice

25ml Fruit Puree/Fresh Fruit

10ml Sugar Syrup

25ml Sweetened Condensed Milk or Coconut Cream

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

172 Calories

Allergens:

No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!

Servings:

Serves 1

Herbaceous, grassy cachaça blended with your choice of punchy fruits and condensed or coconut milk, to make a tropical styled, alcoholic milkshake.

Ingredients

50ml Cachaça

12.5ml Lime Juice

25ml Fruit Puree/Fresh Fruit

10ml Sugar Syrup

25ml Sweetened Condensed Milk or Coconut Cream

Method

Take your blender, make sure it’s plugged in.

Using your Jigger to measure, add the cachaça, sugar syrup and condensed milk/coconut cream to your blender.

Either measure some fruit puree using your jigger, or add fresh fruit of your choosing to the blender.

Using your Mexican elbow and your jigger to measure, squeeze 12.5ml of lime juice and add to the blender.

Add a small scoop of crushed ice and blend until all ingredients are combined to form a smooth creamy texture.

Pour into a rocks glass and garnish with fruit of your choosing.

Serve and enjoy!

Equipment

Blender
Jigger/Measure
Mexican Elbow
Crushed Ice

History

Originating from Brazil, in Portuguese, Batida means ‘shaken’ or ‘milkshake’, the word can also mean ‘crash’. Along with the Caipirinha, the Batida could be considered the country’s national drink. Since the Batida is essentially a creamy, blended Caipirinha at heart, we only really have that history to go on.

There are many theories around how the Caipirinha came to be — one of which suggests that a variation of the drink was used to help cure the Spanish Flu epidemic in the early 20th century and likely contained garlic, honey, lime and other strong natural substances. A slight variation of this is still used to this day to help cure the common cold.