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How to make ...

Aviation

By Adam Hinton

Ingredients

 

40ml Gin

10ml Maraschino Liqueur

5ml Crème de Violette

20ml Lemon Juice

Lemon Twist to garnish

Times:

Prep: 2 Minutes

Make: 30 Seconds

Total: 2 Minutes and 30 Seconds

Calories:

173 Calories

Allergens:

No common allergens to be found, although, since every body is different, we advise you check out this recipe's ingredients list just to be sure!

Servings:

Serves 1

So named for its pale lavender hue, which is said to resemble the colour of the sky, the Aviation is a classic and delicious gin cocktail.

Ingredients

40ml Gin

10ml Maraschino Liqueur

5ml crème de Violette

20ml Lemon Juice

Lemon Twist to garnish

Method

Chill a martini glass in the freezer, or fill it with ice.

Take your Boston glass or small tin and, using your jigger to measure, add the gin to the shaker.

Using a bar spoon (5ml) to measure, add the marschino and violette to your shaker.

Using your Mexican elbow and jigger to measure, squeeze 20ml of lemon juice and add to the shaker.

Fill your shaker with cubed ice, and shake vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold.

Remove your martini glass from the freezer, or empty ice if necessary.

Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain the cocktail into your chilled martini glass.

Garnish with a thin, trimmd lemon twist.

Serve and enjoy!

History

The Aviation is a cocktail first invented by Hugo Ennslin, the head bartender at Hotel Wallick in New York in the early 20th Century. It is a slight variation of another cocktail called “Blue Moon”, with the addition of Maraschino liqueur marking them apart.

This cocktail is a riff on a gin sour with the addition of Maraschino instead of simple syrup as a sweetener. It’s a floral, dry, delicate cocktail that all gin drinkers will like. Good for springtime and dreaming of flying off on your holidays.

It is so called because of the pale blue hue given to the drink by the Creme de Violette, celebrating the glamorous hayday of air travel.

Named the aviation because of the colour given to the cocktail by the addition of crème De Violette. No surprise then that the aviation was invented during the heyday of luxury air travel.