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Margarita

Margarita-cocktail-recipe

Margarita

The ultimate tequila cocktail, the Margarita is a tangy mixture of rich grassy, tequila, tart fresh lime, sweet, citrusy orange liqueur and a savoury salt rim. This bartender-favourite is tasty all year round, working brilliantly as a refreshing summer citrus drink or a strong and warming winter cocktail.

Tequila, Triple Sec, Lime Juice – Nick N Nora*

*premium glassware pictured, event glassware may differ.

We Recommend

Margaritas are a tangy tequila classic, this balanced mixture of sweet and sour flavours is the king of tequila cocktails and the perfect choice for any tequila enthusiasts hosting a mobile bar hire.

Margaritas are a sour style mixture of tequila, triple sec and lime juice, they can be served straight-up or on the rocks, with or without a salt rim and with or without sugar depending on preference.

This is a very forgiving cocktail, tequila and lime are a match made in heaven and the triple sec adds just enough sweetness and spice to give this drink some real depth.

We only use 100% agave tequila in our Margaritas which guarantees a smooth flavour without any harsh undertones. If you’re interested in featuring some other tequila-based cocktails on your menu there are a whole host of fantastic drinks to serve alongside the Margarita.

Another great tequila classic is the Paloma, this tart but dry cocktail adds pink grapefruit juice and apricot liqueur for a subtle, nutty sweetness and a dry, fruity finish.

For those guests with a sweeter tooth, there’s always the Tommy’s Margarita, this simple bartender-favourite forgoes the triple sec, instead combining tequila with lime and agave syrup to sweeten it, served on the rocks without a salt rim. This moreish spin on the classic Marg is sure to convert even the most ardent tequila naysayers.

The Margarita is every bit a classic: simple, balanced, and sustaining. If you want to feature some other classic cocktails on your menu there’s loads of great options.

One of our favourite classics is the Corpse Reviver No.2, this gin cocktail has tart citrusy notes from lemon combined with floral flavours of gin and vermouth, spiced softness of triple sec and a herbaceous finish provided by a dash of absinthe.

If you’re keen to feature a Margarita as part of your bar-hire menu and want to know what other drinks might work well alongside it, be sure to speak to your event organiser, or check out some other tequila-based, sour-style and classic cocktails from our list.

History

The Margarita was created sometime around the 1930’s but nobody is quite sure where or quite sure when. It has gone on to become a classic cocktail the world over with all sorts of weird and wonderful twists and different forms.

The base ingredients should always be the same no matter what is added: tequila, lime and sugar.

According to cocktail historian David Wondrich, author of Imbibe!, the best guess is that the Margarita as we know and love it evolved from a cocktail known as the “Daisy.”

This, a mix of alcohol, citrus juice, and grenadine served over shaved ice, was popular during the 1930s and 40s.

There were gin daisies and whiskey daisies and, eventually, inevitably, tequila daisies, of which the original recipe called for tequila, orange liqueur, lime juice, and a splash of soda.

At some point, this Mexican-influenced drink became known by its Spanish name, Margarita, which means daisy in Spanish.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Margarita—meaning “a cocktail made with tequila and citrus fruit juice”—first appeared in print in English in 1965, though other sources point out that Margaritas were popping up in Jose Cuervo ads as early as 1945.

Myths & Legends

Nobody is entirely sure when the Margarita was first created, we do know that various forms of it have been around since at least the early 1930’s and it was probably created somewhere in America.

With Mexico not having a huge cocktail culture it is unlikely the cocktail originated there, however during prohibition, rich American socialites would often cross the border to Mexico to drink legally so it is possible that the cocktail was created by an American bartender in a bar filled with rich Americans, but in a Mexican resort.

References

According to cocktail historian David Wondrich, author of Imbibe!, the best guess is that the margarita as we know and love it evolved from a cocktail known as the “daisy.” This, a mix of alcohol, citrus juice, and grenadine served over shaved ice, was popular during the 1930s and 40s. There were gin daisies and whiskey daisies and, eventually, inevitably, tequila daisies, the original recipe called for tequila, orange liqueur, lime juice, and a splash of soda. At some point, this Mexican-influenced daisy became known by its Spanish name, margarita, which means daisy in Spanish. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, margarita, meaning: “a cocktail made with tequila and citrus fruit juice”—first appeared in print in English in 1965, though other sources point out that margaritas were popping up in Jose Cuervo ads as early as 1945.

Ingredients & Equipment

Tapatio is a quality, single estate tequila that is perfect for the margarita. Forget all the harsh mixto tequilas you’ve done shots of before, this will change your perception of the spirit. 

Ingredients

  • 35ml Tequila
  • 15ml Triple Sec
  • 25ml Lime Juice
  • Lime Wheel to Garnish
  • Cubed Ice
  • Salt Rim (optional)

 

Equipment

  • Shaker
  • Jigger/Measure
  • Hawthorne Strainer
  • Fine Strainer
  • Mexican Elbow
  • Martini Glass or Coupette
Method
  • Chill your glass in the freezer or fill it with ice
  • Take your Boston glass or small tin
  • Using your jigger to measure add the tequila and triple sec to your shaker
  • Using your Mexican elbow and a jigger to measure, squeeze 25ml of lime juice and add it to the shaker
  • Fill your shaker with cubed ice and seal using your Boston tin or lid
  • Shake vigorously for 10-15 seconds or until your tin is very cold
  • Remove your glass from the freezer or empty of ice if necessary
  • Using your lime wedge, wet the rim of the glass
  • Dip the rim of the glass in salt or sprinkle salt over it to coat the rim
  • Wipe off any excess salt or any on the inside of the glass using a napkin
  • Using your Hawthorne strainer and your fine strainer, double strain your cocktail into your chilled Martini glass or coupette
  • Garnish with a lime wheel or wedge
  • Serve and enjoy!

For larger groups of six or more students, we offer the option to take things private. Our classes are fully portable, and we are able to set ourselves up efficiently and professionally in a wide variety of locations and settings across the capital, the UK, and beyond. You name the location, and we’ll endeavour to make it happen.

Give one of our dedicated event organisers a call on 020 8003 7982. They’ll happily talk you through your options, and answer any questions you may have about both our mobile and in-house cocktail making classes.

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